Salah Khawaja

Salah spent 15+ years in the financial sector in New York, Hong Kong and Tokyo. Initially 11+ years as a management consultant with Deloitte. He then moved to J. P. Morgan and Bank of America where he spent 5 years in the Investment Bank running transformation related projects. Wanting to give back and recognizing the magnitude of the education crises he founded Khud. He believes that education technology coupled with self-learning is the 21st century solution to tackle the education crisis.

M1.jpg

Muhammad Maaz Kamal

Maaz is a serial entrepreneur - twice named among top entrepreneurs in Pakistan by TechJuice. Having founded and raised funding for his own startups, he understands the challenges our local budding startups face. Besides providing consultation to the local startups, he is working on innovative approaches that can supplant traditional education so that the lower strata of society in the developing world can prepare for the jobs of the future!

Untitled.png

Bilal Afzal Khan

Bilal graduated from LUMS and joined Teach For Pakistan with an aim to transform the lives of under-privileged children. He likes to discuss Pakistan and International affairs as the flame inside of him to bring about change keeps on burning. Under the platform of USEFP’s Opportunity Fund project, he has trained students so that they could pursue their education in the US. To improve the learning outcomes of students, he is training teachers, educators and education manager all over the Punjab by working as a Training Consultant for British Council’s PEELI (Punjab Education and English language Initiative).

y.png

Yasmin Shahid

Yasmin completed her B.Sc. from LCWU in 1978 and afterwards she started working in Defence Public School and became Senior Mistress in 2002. After attending different workshops on teachers’ training, she wished to serve children of remote areas in Lahore. In 2012, she established an English Medium School named “Zahoor Ahmad Public School” near a village, 25 km from Lahore. This area of underprivileged people was indeed her targeted community. It is up to sixth grade now with a total of 150 students.